Planting for the Future

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The Lowry Hotel supported the planting of 100 climate resilient trees in a local school in 2022/23.

Project Overview

This report is about the Trees for Schools project where climate resilient trees have been planted in a local primary school thanks to support from The Lowry Hotel, who have also supported planting in 2 more schools.

Every tree planting workshop with the Trees for Schools programme is bespoke and tailored to the needs of the school. We take into account the age of the children and the existing availability of green space for new trees. A pre-planting consultation with the school helps us to understand which species will best suit their plans for the site, map out the planting and plan how the trees will best be used as a resource for the school and community.

Through this project, young people were taught about the importance of trees to local wildlife and why we need to plant them to help protect our planet. The children learnt how to plant trees and then helped plant them with our Education Officer. As well as educating children about climate change and wildlife, this project helped create green learning spaces in schools and benefited children’s health and wellbeing by getting them outside and learning in a new environment.

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Project Statistics

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100

Trees Planted

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90

School Children Involved

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Testimonials

"It was amazing to be planting on the field- I can't believe these are one day going to be gigantic trees! Planting these trees means there will be more places for God's creatures to live in. It was hard work but it will be worth it! I have really enjoyed the day and want to grow a few trees at my house."

Planting for the Next Generation

In May 2023, pupils at Christ the King RC Primary School helped meet the school's target of creating a garden area. As part of a larger field, the school needed advise on how to screen the area to make it a seperate wildlife haven. They were excited to have our Educational Officer Tim to join them for the day, to advise on how to realise their plans and mark the garden off from the rest of the school field. The school will be using the garden to grow their own food for use in cookery lessons.

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Education Officer - Tim Kaye

Meet Our Education Officer

Tim

Tim is an ecologist with 20 + years experience in Environmental Education. He has a particular interest in woodland fungi and recently discovered a rare slug while working on a Teaching Trees visit. Tim covers Herefordshire and Worcestershire, occasionally slightly further afield.

Tree Species Planted:

100 trees planted in Greater Manchester

Tree Leaf
25 Trees Planted

Silver Birch: Betula pendula

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Silver Birch: Betula pendula

The silver birch is an elegant, majestic-looking tree which can survive in a range of climates, making it a very popular choice for gardeners. It attracts hundreds of insect species, and woodpeckers like to nest in its rough, tough, silver-white trunk. There is a lot of mythology attached to the silver birch, which is said to symbolise purity, new beginnings and protection. Once upon a time, on Midsummer’s Eve, silver birch boughs were hung across the doors of houses to bring good luck to their residents.

Tree Leaf
25 Trees Planted

Hazel: Corylus Avellana

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Hazel: Corylus Avellana

The common hazel is native to Europe and western Asia and forms an important part of England’s hedgerows. We have all heard of hazelnuts, which are rich in unsaturated fats and protein, and an extremely popular ingredient in many of the world’s cuisines. Did you know that hazel trees were once seen as both magical and a symbol of fertility?

Tree Leaf
25 Trees Planted

Wild Cherry: Prunus Avium

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Wild Cherry: Prunus Avium

Stunning white cherry blossoms burst forth in April, heralding the arrival of spring and bringing joy to parks and gardens. Mature cherry trees can live for up to 60 years, and provide a great source of food for birds, bees, insects, and small animals like badgers and mice. Our ancestors would boil wild cherries and make them into a syrup to treat a range of ailments including coughs and anaemia.

Tree Leaf
25 Trees Planted

Rowan: Sorbus Aucuparia

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Rowan: Sorbus Aucuparia

Also known as the mountain ash, rowan trees grow well at high altitudes and are commonly found in the Scottish Highlands, as well as on streets and in gardens across the UK. Many birds eat their scarlet berries in the autumn, then disperse the seeds. Rowan used to be planted next to homes to ward off the threat of witches, as red was once believed to guard against evil.

Supported By:

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Project Partner:

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UN's Sustainable Development Goals

As a GreenTheUK partner, you support projects that are in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

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Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.

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Sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, halt and reverse land degradation, halt biodiversity loss.

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